Content Management

Thanking Drupal.org Working Group members

Drupal - 12 February, 2016 - 17:51

Drupal.org, the home of the Drupal community, has grown organically for many years. At some point it grew so large that a clear decision making structure became a necessity. The Drupal Association staff was not in the place to provide it at that time: our entire technology team for Drupal.org, including all its sub-sites and services, consisted of only two people, myself and Neil Drumm—so we turned to community for help.

In the summer of 2013, the three Drupal.org Working Groups were announced. Governance committees, consisting of community members and staff, created to act as a collective 'product owner' for the website. In the following two and a half years, with their guidance and feedback, we implemented many new features, performed user research, developed content strategy, and drastically improved the infrastructure behind Drupal.org.

At the same time the Drupal Association staff kept growing. We hired our first full-time infrastructure staff member, brought in the CTO and customer service coordinator a few months later, then a developer and two more infrastructure team members. And finally, we hired a project manager, a web designer, and one more Drupal developer. Our communications team grew, too: over the last two years, the Drupal Association brought in a content strategist and a dedicated writer. Overall, our capacity increased and a lot of gaps in skills and experience were filled.

Having skilled staff working full-time on Drupal.org, we were finally able to provide product direction, set a roadmap, and execute on it. We adopted Scrum as our project management methodology, with a new sprint starting every two weeks. This encourages iteration and pivoting based on the situation, instead of working against a 'set in stone' year long plan. As our staffing situation changed, we started to realize that the valuable time of dedicated community volunteers can be spent more efficiently than making them sit in countless planning and update meetings with staff.

At the end of last year, the Drupal Association Board, with the input of several Working Group members, made a decision that it is time for staff to work on Drupal.org improvements directly with the community. This means that the Drupal.org Working Groups will transition into an advisory group, with former Drupal.org Working Groups members available as advisors to provide feedback and input on specific initiatives the team is working on, relevant to their own skills and expertise.

The only requirement the Board and Drupal.org Working Groups themselves put out before the transition could happen is this: they asked that the Association staff create a clear process for community members to be able to suggest items on the Drupal.org roadmap, and provide a path for those community members to volunteer to help with implementation. With the input from the Working Groups and the Board, we created such a process. It was
launched last week.

As we reach the end of an era, I'd like to personally thank each member who served at various times on Drupal.org Working Groups over the past three years. Your time, skills, and experience you shared with us has been invaluable.

Gerhard Killesreiter / killes
Narayan Newton / nnewton
Melissa Anderson / eliza411
Angela Byron / webchick
Kim Pepper / kim.pepper
George DeMet / gdemet
Jeff Eaton / eaton
Roy Scholten / yoroy
David Hernandez / davidhernandez
Cathy Theys / YesCT

Thank you! It's been a pleasure to share all those moments, conversations, ideas, debates, and workshops.

While the role of these wonderful people is shifting to a less formal advisory one, we will still be calling on their expertise and help as we continue our work on making Drupal.org a better place.

--
Image by Roy Scholten.

Categories: Content Management

Hippo Launches CMS 10.2

CMS Report - 12 February, 2016 - 14:06

Hybrid Content Platform for a Harmonious Cross-Channel Experience and the Best Customer Journey

Web Content Management vendor Hippo has launched the 10.2 version of it’s platform. With this release, Hippo combines Content as a Service use cases and traditional digital experience management as part of a hybrid, integrated cross-channel strategy. It provides advanced personalisation features and true content interoperability across all channels, applications and devices. With version 10.2, Hippo enforces their position in full cross-channel content delivery and performance insights, being the preferred platform for businesses to optimize their entire customer journey from begin to end. This new release also makes it easier for application developers and web developers to reuse content from traditional web channels for mobile apps, web applications based on MVC JavaScript frameworks such as AngularJS or Backbone.js, wearables and Internet of Things (IoT) devices.  

Categories: Content Management

Contentful appoints Anton Marinovich as Head of Sales

CMS Report - 11 February, 2016 - 12:00

Berlin, February 09, 2016 - Contentful, the API-driven Content-as-a-service (CaaS) platform appoints Anton Marinovich as its Head of Sales. Marinovich joins Contentful with more than 10 years of experience in sales and client services. He was most recently a Director at Aon in London, but has had sales leadership roles in Silicon Valley with companies like Meltwater and Equilar.

“The Content-as-a-Service sector is a new and very exciting sector and Contentful is leading the way. After my first conversations with Sascha and the team I knew right away that this opportunity was something I could not miss out on.  I’m excited and eager to put my experience to good use and help with our growth,” said Marinovich.

Categories: Content Management

Are Industrial Control Systems the Latest Weapon in Modern Warfare?

CMS Report - 10 February, 2016 - 20:56

Are industrial control and SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) systems the new frontier, not just for cyber-crime but also for cyberwar? Until recently, when you were at war with a country, you sent in your bombers. First they hit the military targets. Once they had finished those off, they would hit infrastructure, with attacks designed to destroy industry and demoralize the civilian population.

Electricity production, oil and gas, even water and waste services would all be targeted. However, nowadays, you don't need brute force to turn the lights off. This was recently demonstrated by hackers attacking The Ukraine, who succeeded in knocking out power supplies to up to 1.4 million residents through the social engineering attack known as spear phishing. An infected Word document was used to introduce BlackEnergy malware into critical systems.

Categories: Content Management

Turning Drupal outside-in

Drupal - 10 February, 2016 - 19:01

Republished from buytaert.net

There has been a lot of discussion around the future of the Drupal front end both on Drupal.org (#2645250, #2645666, #2651660, #2655556) and on my blog posts about the future of decoupled Drupal, why a standard framework in core is a good idea, and the process of evaluating frameworks. These all relate to my concept of "progressive decoupling", in which some portions of the page are handed over to client-side logic after Drupal renders the initial page (not to be confused with "full decoupling").

My blog posts have drawn a variety of reactions. Members of the Drupal community, including Lewis Nyman, Théodore Biadala and Campbell Vertesi, have written blog posts with their opinions, as well as Ed Faulkner of the Ember community. Last but not least, in response to my last blog post, Google changed Angular 2's license from Apache to MIT for better compatibility with Drupal. I read all the posts and comments with great interest and wanted to thank everyone for all the feedback; the open discussion around this is nothing short of amazing. This is exactly what I hoped for: community members from around the world brainstorming about the proposal based on their experience, because only with the combined constructive criticism will we arrive at the best solution possible.

Based on the discussion, rather than selecting a client-side JavaScript framework for progressive decoupling right now, I believe the overarching question the community wants to answer first is: How do we keep Drupal relevant and widen Drupal's adoption by improving the user experience (UX)?

Improving Drupal's user experience is a topic near and dear to my heart. Drupal's user experience challenges led to my invitation to Mark Boulton to redesign Drupal 7, the creation of the Spark initiative to improve the authoring experience for Drupal 8, and continued support for usability-related initiatives. In fact, the impetus behind progressive decoupling and adopting a client-side framework is the need to improve Drupal's user experience.

It took me a bit longer than planned, but I wanted to take the time to address some of the concerns and share more of my thoughts about improving Drupal's UX (and JavaScript frameworks).

To iterate or to disrupt?

In his post, Lewis writes that the issues facing Drupal's UX "go far deeper than code" and that many of the biggest problems found during the Drupal 8 usability study last year are not resolved with a JavaScript framework. This is true; the results of the Drupal 8 usability study show that Drupal can confuse users with its complex mental models and terminology, but it also shows how modern features like real-time previews and in-page block insertion are increasingly assumed to be available.

To date, much of our UX improvements have been based on an iterative process, meaning it converges on a more refined end state by removing problems in the current state. However, we also require disruptive thinking, which is about introducing entirely new ideas, for true innovation to happen. It's essentially removing all constraints and imagining what an ideal result would look like.

I think we need to recognize that while some of the documented usability problems coming out of the Drupal 8 usability study can be addressed by making incremental changes to Drupal's user experience (e.g. our terminology), other well-known usability problems most likely require a more disruptive approach (e.g. our complex mental model). I also believe that we must acknowledge that disruptive improvements are possibly more impactful in keeping Drupal relevant and widening Drupal's adoption.

At this point, to get ahead and lead, I believe we have to do both. We have to iterate and disrupt.

From inside-out to outside-in

Let's forget about Drupal for a second and observe the world around us. Think of all the web applications you use on a regular basis, and consider the interaction patterns you find in them. In popular applications like Slack, the user can perform any number of operations to edit preferences (such as color scheme) and modify content (such as in-place editing) without incurring a single full page refresh. Many elements of the page can be changed without the user's flow being interrupted. Another example is Trello, in which users can create new lists on the fly and then add cards to them without ever having to wait for a server response.

Contrast this with Drupal's approach, where any complex operation requires the user to have detailed prior knowledge about the system. In our current mental model, everything begins in the administration layer at the most granular level and requires an unmapped process of bottom-up assembly. A user has to make a content type, add fields, create some content, configure a view mode, build a view, and possibly make the view the front page. If each individual step is already this involved, consider how much more difficult it becomes to traverse them in the right order to finally see an end result. While very powerful, the problem is that Drupal's current model is "inside-out". This is why it would be disruptive to move Drupal towards an "outside-in" mental model. In this model, I should be able to start entering content, click anything on the page, seamlessly edit any aspect of its configuration in-place, and see the change take effect immediately.

Drupal 8's in-place editing feature is actually a good start at this; it enables the user to edit what they see without an interrupted workflow, with faster previews and without needing to find what thing it is before they can start editing.

Making it real with content modeling

Eight years ago in 2007, I wrote about a database product called DabbleDB. I shared my belief that it was important to move CCK and Views into Drupal's core and learn from DabbleDB's integrated approach. DabbleDB was acquired by Twitter in 2010 but you can still find an eight-year-old demo video on YouTube. While the focus of DabbleDB is different, and the UX is obsolete, there is still a lot we can learn from it today: (1) it shows a more integrated experience between content creation, content modeling, and creating views of content, (2) it takes more of an outside-in approach, (3) it uses a lot less intimidating terminology while offering very powerful capabilities, and (4) it uses a lot of in-place editing. At a minimum, DabbleDB could give us some inspiration for what a better, integrated content modeling experience could look like, with the caveat that the UX should be as effortless as possible to match modern standards.

Other new data modeling approaches with compelling user experiences have recently entered the landscape. These include back end-as-a-service (BEaaS) solutions such as Backand, which provides a visually clean drag-and-drop interface for data modeling and helpful features for JavaScript application developers. Our use cases are not quite the same, but Drupal would benefit immensely from a holistic experience for content modeling and content views that incorporates both the rich feature set of DabbleDB and the intuitive UX of Backand.

This sort of vision was not possible in 2007 when CCK was a contributed module for Drupal 6. It still wasn't possible in Drupal 7 when Views existed as a separate contributed module. But now that both CCK and Views are in Drupal 8 core, we can finally start to think about how we can more deeply integrate the two. This kind of integration would be nontrivial but could dramatically simplify Drupal's UX. This should be really exciting because so many people are attracted to Drupal exactly because of features like CCK and Views. Taking an integrated approach like DabbleDB, paired with a seamless and easy-to-use experience like Slack, Trello and Backand, is exactly the kind of disruptive thinking we should do.

What most of the examples above have in common are in-place editing, immediate previews, no page refreshes, and non-blocking workflows. The implications on our form and render systems of providing configuration changes directly on the rendered page are significant. To achieve this requires us to have robust state management and rendering on the client side as well as the server side. In my vision, Twig will provide structure for the overall page and non-interactive portions, but more JavaScript will more than likely be necessary for certain parts of the page in order to achieve the UX that all users of the web have come to expect.

We shouldn't limit ourselves to this one example, as there are a multitude of Drupal interfaces that could all benefit from both big and small changes. We all want to improve Drupal's user experience — and we have to. To do so, we have to constantly iterate and disrupt. I hope we can all collaborate on figuring out what that looks like.

Special thanks to Preston So and Kevin O'Leary for contributions to this blog post and to Wim Leers for feedback.

Continue the conversation on buytaert.net

Front page news: Drupal NewsDrupal version: Drupal 8.x
Categories: Content Management

6 Keys to Improving Your Video Optimization for Mobile

CMS Report - 9 February, 2016 - 21:14

The ubiquitous spread of mobile devices has reached a fever pitch, and, yet, it still shows no signs of slowing down. Over 6 billion smartphones are projected to be in use by 2020, which means your website — and anything related to your online presence — better perform amazingly on a mobile device. Text, graphics, calls to action, video — it all needs to make sense and load quickly across a variety of smaller screens and operating systems, or you stand to lose out on traffic and dollars. Especially since video content continues its meteoric rise in popularity over other types, the need for optimized video is especially crucial.

Regardless of whether you're a marketer, a small-business owner, a blogger, or a YouTube star, the time for making great video — LAI Video can help with that — and optimizing that video to ensure it's easy to watch on a mobile device is now. Here are six keys to improving your video optimization so it works and looks great across the mobile spectrum.

Categories: Content Management

How the Hybrid Cloud is Reinventing Software Storage

CMS Report - 9 February, 2016 - 10:45

Hybrid cloud storage has reinvented the way the cloud is used and implemented. Companies can use aspects of the cloud but choose to store data in a private or public cloud, or on their premises. They are opting to choose which data to store on site and what is stored in the cloud based on risk identification, bandwidth, and other factors. A public storage cloud is certainly fine for disaster recovery and backup, depending on the business’ needs.

Software storage by nature separates the data storage aspects from physical storage resources. This has given rise to services based solely on data storage and offerings such as software-defined networking. Administrators often have flexible management options while policy-based management may be automated. The biggest impact, however, is how vendors are evolving their product lines or creating new ones to accommodate the demand for hybrid cloud software storage.

Categories: Content Management

Preservica warns companies to safeguard against future 'X-Files'

CMS Report - 8 February, 2016 - 22:21

With many file formats and software popular in 1993 now obsolete and unreadable, company compliance and information governance teams are warned against losing critical digital information forever

As 90s hit television series The X-Files returns to our screens next month after a 13 year hiatus, digital preservation specialist Preservica has launched an awareness campaign to highlight the danger of file format and software obsolescence, and an impending ‘Digital Dark Age’ – warned against by Google’s Vint Cerf last year.

In conjunction with the new series of the popular US TV show, fans of the original series at Preservica have been pointing out the many changes in software that have occurred since the first episodes of The X-Files aired more than twenty years ago, in 1993.

Many popular file formats and software applications popular in 1993 have already disappeared or become obsolete. With technology refresh rates and application de-commissioning programmes beginning to accelerate, critical long-term information and files are now more at risk than ever.

Categories: Content Management

The new Joomla! Shop is looking for creative minds to design new Joomla! items.

Joomla! - 8 February, 2016 - 17:22


In the Joomla! Community there is a constant and urgent need for capable designers that can contribute their creativity and colourful skills to create beautiful artwork. If you are a talented designer with passion for Joomla! and good design, this is a great opportunity you shouldn’t miss!

Categories: Content Management

The Costs of Content and Why You Should Pay Up

CMS Report - 8 February, 2016 - 12:11

Content marketing remains essential to a business’s success. Nearly every Internet-savvy business owner is well-aware of the necessity of producing content to gain visibility and grow brand awareness. However, as content floods all corners of the Web, businesses are beginning to see that not just any content will satisfy their hungry audiences ― only fresh, exciting, high-quality content will do. Unfortunately, high-quality content comes at a cost.

While setting up a company blog may take five minutes, filling that blog takes years of effort, and in business, time and money are forever linked. New businesses just taking their first tentative steps into the content pool would do well to understand just how much they should spend to produce the content they need to succeed ― or they might drown in expenses before the year is through.

Categories: Content Management

Europe: Software-as-a-Service driving ISV sector growth

CMS Report - 6 February, 2016 - 15:21

The annual survey of the top 500 Independent Software Vendors (ISVs) in Europe shows some major changes due to substantial growth in some areas, consolidation and changing market conditions. After a slow rise of 5% in the previous year, it looks like ISV fortunes have turned around strongly in 2015, based on early figures. The latest database report by IT Europa, ISVs in Europe - the top 500, published today shows a shake-up at the top of the list of individual companies, with three newcomers to the top ten. There has also been a big jump in those reporting that they offer Software-as-a-Service (SaaS). In 2016, nearly 90% of ISVs said they offer SaaS, an increase of over 60% from 2014. But it is not all packages and cloud; bespoke software development is also on the rise with just under 60% offering it.

Categories: Content Management

What’s new on Drupal.org? - January 2016

Drupal - 5 February, 2016 - 16:41

Look at our Roadmap highlighting how this work falls into our priorities set by the Drupal Association staff with the direction from the Board and collaboration with the community.

Drupal.org Updates Following the Conversation

One of the most requested features from a wide swath of the community has been a better way to follow content on Drupal.org and receive email notifications. The issue queues have had this follow functionality for some time, but the implementation was quite specific to issues, and not easily extensible to the rest of the site.

Because of the volume of content on Drupal.org we have to be careful that our implementation will scale well. We now use a notification system based on the Message stack which functions much more generically and therefore can be applied to many content types on Drupal.org.

Follow functionality is now available for comments on Forum topics, Posts (like this one), Case Studies, and documentation Book Pages.

In the future we intend to extend this follow functionality to include notification of new revisions (for relevant content types, particularly documentation).

Community Elections for the Board

Nominations for the position of At-Large Director from the community are now open. There are two of these positions on the board, each elected on alternating years. For this year's elections process we've made several small refinements:

  • Candidates are now no longer required to display their real names on their candidate profile. We will now default to the Drupal.org username.
  • Candidates do not have to provide a photo, we will default to a generic avatar.
  • There is now an elections landing page with complete details about the elections process.

We encourage members of the community to nominate themselves!

Drupal.org Enhancements

A number of smaller enhancements made it into the January sprints as well. One of the key ones was the ability to configure an arbitrary one-off test in the issue queues against a custom branch. This is a small step towards ensuring that the DrupalCI testing framework will support the wider testing matrix required for feature branching, so that Drupal can always be shippable.

We also spent some time in January reviewing the results of the documentation survey that was placed on all existing documentation pages on the site. This information is helping to inform the next big item on the roadmap - improved Documentation section on Drupal.org.

Finally, we've continued our battle against spam with the help of Technology Supporter, Distil Networks. We've seen some very promising results in initial trials to prevent spam account registrations from happening in the first place, and will continue to work on refining our integration.

Sustaining support and maintenance

DrupalCon New Orleans Full -Site Launched!

In January we also launched the full -site for DrupalCon New Orleans with registration and the call for papers. As part of this launch, Events.drupal.org now supports multiple, simultaneous event registrations with multiple currencies, payment processors, and invoice formats. This was a significant engineering lift, but has made Events.drupal.org even more robust.

DrupalCon New Orleans is happening from May 9-13th, and will be the first North American DrupalCon after the release of Drupal 8!

DrupalCon Dublin

The next European DrupalCon will also be here before you know it, and we've been working with the local community and our designer to update the DrupalCon Dublin splash page with a new logo that we will carry through into the design for the full-site once that is ready to launch.

Permissions for Elevated Users

In January we also focused on auditing the users with elevated privileges on Drupal.org, both to ensure that they had the permissions they needed, and to enforce our principle of least-access. Users at various levels of elevated privileges were contacted to see if they were still needed, and if not those privileged roles were removed.

The following privileges were also fixed or updated: webmasters can now view a user's' public ssh keys; content moderators can administer comments and block spam users without user profile editing privileges. We also fixed taxonomy vocabulary access and now both content moderators and webmasters have access to edit tags in various vocabularies such as Issue tags, giving more community members access to clean those up and fight duplicates or unused tags.

Updates traffic now redirects to HTTPS

SSL is now the default for FTP traffic from Drupal.org and for Updates.drupal.org itself. This helps to enforce a best practice of using SSL wherever possible, and helps to address an oblique attack surface where a man-in-the-middle could potentially hijack an update for someone running their Drupal installation on an unprotected network (i.e. development environments on a personal laptop in a coffee shop).

Devwww2 Recovery

Drupal.org pre-production environments were affected by some instability in January, particulary the devwww2 server. A combination of a hard restart due to losing a NIC on the machine and some file-system level optimizations in the database containers lead to corruption on the dev site databases. Drupal.org infrastructure engineers restored the system and recovered the critical dev sites, and while some instability continues the system has been recovering more cleanly as they work to resolve the issue permanently.

———

As always, we’d like to say thanks to all the volunteers who work with us, and to the Drupal Association Supporters, who made it possible for us to work on these projects.

Follow us on Twitter for regular updates: @drupal_org, @drupal_infra

Categories: Content Management

Ipswitch Survey Reveals IT Teams in a Battle for File Transfer Security

CMS Report - 4 February, 2016 - 19:23

LONDON, UK. – February 4, 2016 – Given the increase in threats and vulnerabilities introduced to the market on a daily basis, the process of moving company data securely is critical to the role of IT teams. Today, Ipswitch announced the findings of their new survey that evaluated the current file transfer solutions and policies in place for 555 IT professionals across the globe. The survey found that while IT teams believe secure file transfers are very important to their organizations, they lack the necessary tools to do so.

Key findings included:

  • While 76 percent of IT professionals said that being able to securely transfer and share files internally and externally is very important, 61 percent said that unsecure cloud-file sharing services like Dropbox are being used within their organizations.
  • 32 percent of IT professionals said that they do not have a file transfer policy in place, but 25 percent plan to integrate one. A quarter (25 percent) of IT professionals said that their organizations have file transfer technology policies in place but indicated that enforcement is inconsistent.
  • 21 percent of IT professionals said they may have experienced a data breach or suffered data loss but are not sure. More than a third (38 percent) of IT professionals said their processes to identify and mitigate file transfer risk are not efficient.
  • Less than half (46 percent) of IT professional respondents said that they have a Managed File Transfer (MFT) solution in place.
Categories: Content Management

Drupal 8.0.3 and 7.42 released

Drupal - 3 February, 2016 - 19:16

Drupal 8.0.3 and Drupal 7.42, maintenance releases with numerous bug fixes (no security fixes), are now available for download.

See the Drupal 8.0.3 release notes and Drupal 7.42 release notes for full lists of included fixes.

Download Drupal 8.0.3
Download Drupal 7.42

Upgrading your existing Drupal 8 and 7 sites is recommended. There are no major nor non-backwards-compatible features in these releases. For more information about the Drupal 8.x release series, consult the Drupal 8 overview. More information on the Drupal 7.x release series can be found in the Drupal 7.0 release announcement.

Security information

We have a security announcement mailing list and a history of all security advisories, as well as an RSS feed with the most recent security advisories. We strongly advise Drupal administrators to sign up for the list.

Drupal 8 includes the built-in Update Manager module, which informs you about important updates to your modules and themes.

There are no security fixes in these releases of Drupal core.

Bug reports

Drupal 8.0.x and 7.x actively maintained, so more maintenance releases will be made available, according to our monthly release cycle.

Change log

Drupal 8.0.3 contains bug fixes and documentation and testing improvements only. The full list of changes between the last 8.0.x patch release and the 8.0.3 release can be found by reading the 8.0.3 release notes. A complete list of all changes in the stable 8.0.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Drupal 7.42 contains bug fixes and minor new features. The full list of changes between the last 7.x patch release and the 7.42 release can be found by reading the 7.42 release notes. A complete list of all changes in the stable 7.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Update notes

See the 8.0.3 release notes and 7.42 release notes for details on important changes in these releases.

Known issues

See the 8.0.3 release notes and 7.42 release notes for known issues.

Front page news: Planet DrupalDrupal version: Drupal 7.xDrupal 8.x
Categories: Content Management

Infographic: Your Slow Website Costs You Money

CMS Report - 3 February, 2016 - 14:10

John Stevens over at Hosting Facts posted an infographic that the negatives of a slow website are too significant to ignore. Slow website speed have real impacts impacts on customer satisfaction Your Conversions and Advertising revenues can go down steadily without an active formulation of your website speed.

The implosion process is so gradual that your initial assessment revolves around the areas of deficiency in your services or attributing it to a weaker product. Prospects percentage dip and the existing chunk of your customers don’t bring you additional leads.

In such a scenario, customer outreach and feedback becomes all the more important as a visibility in their ordinary website experience can be easily seen.

Not alarmingly, we came across numerous surveys, outlining some startling facts, but coming out with the similar results, which we thought we should essentially share with you. 

John and Hosting Facts has provided an infographic that not just highlights some of the critical facts but also brings to light how inadequately some of our cardinal; however undermined business imperatives are measured. We encourage you to visit his website to find out more.

Categories: Content Management

Kentico Survey Says: Interest in Smartwatches is on the Rise

CMS Report - 2 February, 2016 - 22:05

Over two and half years ago, I wrote that wearables would be the next "disruptive innovation" but acknowledged we're not there yet. Once the right company with the right design comes along, this new market will take off just as fast as when Apple introduced their first iPad. Despite Apple introducing their smartwatch, I still sit on the sidelines waiting for the right wearable to convince me the time to buy one is now. According to the findings from a recent survey unveiled by Kentico, I'm not alone.

 

Categories: Content Management

JUG team seeks new Team Lead

Joomla! - 2 February, 2016 - 18:26

The Joomla User Group (JUG) team is a vital part of our community, ensuring that our passionate community members can connect with other people living near them and meet up in-person to share their love for Joomla!.

The JUG Team is looking for a new Team Lead.

The Role Description is: 

  • Organise and chair JUG team meetings

  • Communicate with CLT Liaison

  • Oversee JUG team public communications

  • Organise end-of-term reviews for JUG team members

  • Review listings escalated by the JUG team

  • Ensure updated terms of service and documentation for JUG directory

  • Overall responsibility for JUG team

  • Attendance at Joomla community events where possible

Additionally, normal JUG Member responsibilities apply.  The JUG team lead will also be responsible for appointing and co-ordinating the assistant team lead roles. 

You can find out more about the JUG team and read our previous reports at https://volunteers.joomla.org/working-groups/user-groups-team

If you are interested in applying for the JUG Team Lead role, please fill out the application at http://goo.gl/forms/PeHlU1NJwg.

We have a pretty good team established now so a Team Lead that will be responsive to email, keep on top of new/updated listings and member enquiries will enable the JUG Team to be more involved with outreach and helping JUGs do more.  We're looking forward to hearing from you!

Questions? Email the JUG team at jugs@community.joomla.org or email CLT liaison ruth.cheesley@community.joomla.org 

To discuss this blog post, please use the following forum thread: http://forum.joomla.org/viewtopic.php?f=704&t=905459

Categories: Content Management

WordPress 4.4.2 Security and Maintenance Release

Wordpress - 2 February, 2016 - 17:57

WordPress 4.4.2 is now available. This is a security release for all previous versions and we strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.

WordPress versions 4.4.1 and earlier are affected by two security issues: a possible SSRF for certain local URIs, reported by Ronni Skansing; and an open redirection attack, reported by Shailesh Suthar.

Thank you to both reporters for practicing responsible disclosure.

In addition to the security issues above, WordPress 4.4.2 fixes 17 bugs from 4.4 and 4.4.1. For more information, see the release notes or consult the list of changes.

Download WordPress 4.4.2 or venture over to Dashboard → Updates and simply click “Update Now.” Sites that support automatic background updates are already beginning to update to WordPress 4.4.2.

Thanks to everyone who contributed to 4.4.2:

Andrea Ferciaberengerzyla, Boone Gorges, Chandra Patel, Chris Christoff, Dion Hulse, Dominik Schilling, firebird75, Ivan Kristianto, Jennifer M. Dodd, salvoaranzulla

Categories: Content Management

Introducing a new Community Initiatives Process

Drupal - 1 February, 2016 - 22:59
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One of the most important lessons of 2015 for the Engineering Team here at the Drupal Association is that we need better ways to engage with you, the community. We realized we need better tools and ways to communicate with you about our current priorities, how you can influence those priorities, and how you can help make Drupal.org and the Drupal project better than ever.

All of the work we do stems from the mission of the Drupal Association. It's our duty and responsibility to unite a global open source community to build and promote Drupal. As the home of that community, and the codebase, Drupal.org is perhaps the most critical piece of that mission, and at the most basic level all of the initiatives we prioritize must support that goal.

As part of reviewing our work in 2015, and in the interests of being transparent with the Drupal Community, we revamped the Drupal.org Roadmap. As you can see, we chose to focus on the few, most important initiatives that we have the capacity to execute on in the near term. We're also including upcoming initiatives that we will move into as the active work is completed, but not as many as we had previously displayed. An important lesson of the past year is that we have to be Agile on the macro scale as well as on the micro. The needs of the community can change rapidly and we need to be able to respond.

Current

These are the initiatives the Drupal Association technology staff is focused on now.

Issues 1. #2551607: [meta] Path forward for Composer support 2. #2533684: Create 'Documentation' Section 3. Update content style guide 4. Create Bluecheese pattern library 5. #2559711: [meta] Drupal.org (websites/infra) blockers to Drupal 8.0.0, 8.1.0, etc. 6. Make ads served through DfP contextual Planned

These are the initiatives the Association will work on once the Current initiatives are completed. The order of these initiatives may change.

Issues 1. #1487662: Create 'Develop with Drupal' Section 2. #2533804: Create 'Support' Section 3. #1288470: Create 'Community' Section 4. #1414988: Create 'Contribute' Section

We've also added some new iconography to indicate where some of these initiatives come from.

Initiatives with the tools ( ) icon represent essential support and maintenance work. This can mean paying down technical debt in the Drupal.org codebase, performing server maintenance, or implementing cost saving measures to help fund the rest of our mission driven work.

Initiatives with the community ( ) icon represent initiatives that were directly proposed by members of the community and/or are being supported by volunteer work from the community.

Don't all the initiatives come from the community?

Yes, all of our priorities come from the needs of the community - but the community is a loose collective of many different groups of people with many different needs and priorities.

The needs of Drupal newcomers are vastly different from those of the Drupal Core Maintainers. The needs of our documentation editors are different from the needs of those providing support on the forums. And all of these needs must cohere with a larger product and design vision for Drupal.org to make this home of the community a cohesive, efficient, and beautiful place to be.

The Drupal Association Engineering Team can be thought of as the maintainers for Drupal.org and the sub-sites. It's our duty to synthesize these diverse needs and to prioritize the major initiatives that will have the highest impact for the community. It's also our job to make the architectural decisions for Drupal.org to ensure that every aspect of the site is functional/useable, consistent, and maintainable.

Most of our priorities, therefore, we set ourselves by bringing all of these factors together and doing the best we can to have the biggest impact, not just on the most vocal parts of the community, but also on those parts that are sometimes siloed or overlooked.

All that said, the community is absolutely a vital part of creating our initiatives. The maintainers for any other project on Drupal.org do not act alone - they accept feedback and contributions from other contributors, while at the same time making key architectural decisions, reviewing patches, and ultimately deploying that work in the form of new releases. We do the same with our initiatives.

Community Volunteers and Community Initiatives

There are two ways that members of the community can have a direct influence on the Roadmap for Drupal.org. These methods have existed informally in the past, but in 2016 we'd like to beta test some new ideas to make these processes more formal, consistent, and transparent.

The first way is simply to volunteer your expertise to help with one of the existing initiatives we already have prioritized, or even to offer your expertise without a particular contribution in mind. There is a strong record of community volunteers helping to improve Drupal.org, just a few examples from the last year include: u/mlhess and u/nnewton helping with infrastructure; to u/michelle helping to clean up spam; to u/dddave and others in the webmasters queue; or u/mshmsh5000 who helped with Drupal Jobs feature development.

If you have expertise (and not just in code!) and are ready for guidance from the Drupal Association engineering team as to how you can help, you can offer your assistance as a volunteer.

Learn about Volunteering

I should also note - we strongly encourage most volunteers to first consider giving back to the Drupal project itself, but we are certainly happy for help with Drupal.org

The second way to influence the Drupal.org roadmap is to develop a community initiative. If you (and perhaps a small team of others in the community) have some expertise in a particular area, and have a particular initiative in mind that you would like to work on, you can propose a community initiative.

View Community Initiatives

Community initiatives come in all shapes in sizes: from documentation audits with the help of u/dead_arm; to adding two factor authentication to Drupal.org with u/coltrane; to a much larger task like building and deploying DrupalCI with the help of u/jthorson, u/nickscuch, u/ricardoamaro, u/bastianwidmer and several others. Some initiatives affect a subset of the community, project maintainers, for example, whereas others may affect almost every user.

Why this new process?

The hard lesson we've learned over the course of the past year is that we need to be involved early. Even in cases where the community volunteers driving an initiative forward are experts in their area - if Association staff are not involved early in the architectural and planning decisions then what should be a positive, collaborative effort is often slowed down by architectural refactoring and design decision backtracks. That is not fun for anybody, and our immense respect for our community collaborators requires that we set them up for success by getting involved early.

As such, our new community initiatives process has several steps:

  1. Community members plan their contribution in an issue, and identify who (if anyone) is able to volunteer some time to make the contribution.
  2. The community members propose their initiative to the Association - so that we can evaluate it for inclusion on our roadmap. This may include a call with the community members proposing the initiative to talk it through in greater detail.
  3. Association staff evaluate the initiative: prioritize it into the roadmap, postpone it, or--if necessary-- reject initiatives that are not a good fit.
  4. Prioritized community initiatives are rolled into the larger Drupal.org roadmap, and monthly or bi-monthly community initiative meetings are scheduled to ensure the work moves forward.
  5. A liaison from the Association engineering team is assigned, to help coordinate architectural decisions, to provide support and access as needed, and to coordinate with the larger team when it is time for the work to be reviewed.

This process is time intensive - and so in general we expect to be able to run only one or maybe two community initiatives at a time, in parallel with our other work. We realize this may be frustrating, but the last year has shown that our most successful initiatives required this close coordination.

This process is new, and will evolve

Finding a good process for working closely with such a diverse and passionate community is not easy—and we aren't assuming that this new process will be perfect. We're going to trial this new community initiative process in 2016 with the goal of increasing the transparency of how we prioritize our work, and how the community can help us build a better Drupal.org. We are committed to making this process better.

Categories: Content Management

2016 Nominations Open for Drupal Association At-Large Director

Drupal - 1 February, 2016 - 15:56
Overview

It’s a great time to be part of the Drupal Association. We’ve done some amazing work in the last few years, and we’re in a great position to work with the community to continue to improve and grow fully into our mission. As a Drupal Association At-Large Director, you’d be in the center of the action. The At-large Director position is specifically designed to ensure community representation on the Drupal Association board and we strongly encourage anyone with an interest to nominate themselves today.

Nominate Yourself Today

The Board of Directors of the Drupal Association are responsible for financial oversight and setting the strategic direction of the Drupal Association. New board members will contribute to the strategic direction of the Drupal Association. Board members are advised of, but not responsible for matters related to the day to day operations of the Drupal Association, including program execution, staffing, etc. You can learn more about what’s expected of a board member in this post and presentation.

Directors are expected to contribute around five hours per month and attend two in-person meetings per year (financial assistance is available if required). All board members agree to meet the minimum requirements documented in the board member agreement.

Today we are opening the self-nomination form that allows you to throw your hat in the ring. We're looking to elect one candidate this year to serve a two-year term.

How to Nominate Yourself

To nominate yourself, you should be prepared to answer a few questions:

  • About Me: Tell us about yourself! Your background, how you got into Drupal, etc.
  • Motivation: Why are you applying for a board position? What initiatives do you hope to help drive, or what perspectives are you going to try and represent?
  • Experience: What Drupal community contributions have you taken part in (code, camps, etc.)? Do you have experience in financial oversight, developing business strategies, or organization governance?
  • Availability: I am able to travel to three in-person board meetings per year (either self-funded, or with financial sponsorship)
  • IRC Handle
  • Twitter Handle

We've also made a few changes to the process based on community feedback from the 2015 election:

  • We now display your username, not your given name, on your candidate profile to address privacy concerns that had been raised. Nominees should note that given names are required on legal documentation such as our 990 IRS filings, but we will do our best to preserve your privacy where we can. 
  • Updated sidebar block has more information about the elections, making it easier to the information you need. 
  • When you nominate yourself we will ask if you would like to opt-in to share your election results data. Last year was the first time we published full results from the vote data. Candidates that opt-in will have their name displayed next to their vote counts, as in this example from 2015.

We will also need to know that you are available for the next step in the process, meet the candidate sessions. We are hosting 3 sessions: 

Meet the Candidate Web Conferences:

Session One
Tue 23 Feb 2016 at 16:00 UTC

  • 7 AM PST Tue 23 Feb, US and Canada
  • 10 AM EST Tue 23 Feb, US and Canada
  • 1 PM Tue 23 Feb, Sao Paulo Brasil
  • 3 PM Tue 23 Feb, London
  • 11 PM Tue 23 Feb, Beijing

Session Two
Wed 24 Feb 2016 at 21:00 UTC

  • 12 PM PST Wed 24 Feb, US and Canada
  • 3 PM EST Wed 24 Feb, US and Canada
  • 5 PM Wed 24 Feb, Sao Paulo Brasil
  • 8 PM Wed 24 Feb, London
  • 4 AM Thu 26 Feb, Beijing
  • 7 AM Thu 26 Feb, Sydney Australia

Session Three
Thu 25 Feb 2016 at 01:00 UTC

  • 4:00 PM PST Thu 25 Feb, US and Canada
  • 7:00 PM EST Thu 25 Feb, US and Canada
  • 9:00 PM Thu 25 Feb, Sau Paulo Brasil
  • 12:00 AM Fri 26 Feb, London
  • 8:00 AM Fri 26 Feb, Beijing
  • 11:00 AM Fri 26 Feb, Sydney Australia

The nomination form will be open February 1, 2016 through February 20, 2016 at midnight UTC. For a thorough review of the process, please see the elections home page.

If you have any questions, please contact Holly Ross, Drupal Association Executive Director. For the sake of keeping conversational threads in one place, the comments on this news item have been closed. Please comment on the original post on the Drupal Association website.

Flickr photo: Clyde Robinson

Front page news: Drupal News
Categories: Content Management

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